Basic Mapzen/Tangram test

pg_mapzen

Over the past few days, I’ve jumped into the Mapzen/Tangram ecosystem. First impressions: somewhat steep learning curve to grasp YAML format, lighting options are pretty neat, very fast to render GeoJSON, documentation is good although asks a lot of the newbie reader, the provided Mapzen Vector Tile Service (mostly OSM) is awesome, and I bet shaders are cool, but I don’t understand them (yet).

My example is largely based off the Mapzen JS Walkthrough, with a few simple additional wrinkles. I draw parcel geometry and attribute data directly from Open Data Prince George. I take building data from the same source, remove OSM buildings from the scene, and draw/extrude 3D buildings based on the building height attribute.

Antipodes (MapboxGL)

antipodes

In 2013, I made an interactive antipode map (points on opposite sides of the Earth) using the Google Maps API. As I’m trying to make the leap from Google Maps/Mapbox JS to Mapbox GL JShere is my rehash of the same map. The only tangible difference between these two maps is that you can rotate this version (right-click and drag).

Some issues I have yet to solve:

  • I can’t seem to get the rotated maps’ labels to display correctly (i.e. right-side up and left to right). I would need to somehow change them to be rendered as a mirror image.
  • The second set of maps don’t render at all in Chrome, although they do while testing locally. This entire project seems to work in IE and Firefox. edit: this project now seems to work in Chrome.

– this map was featured on Google Maps Mania! http://googlemapsmania.blogspot.ca/2016/07/the-antipodes-maps.html

 

Draggable Latitude Line Map

latline

I just returned home from a trip to Scandinavia (Denmark/Sweden/Norway), and was curious to see how far north I’d gone. I made it as far as Tromsø, which is at about 69.7°N, but where would that latitude place me in North America? It turns out, pretty far north – about halfway up Baffin Island. See for yourself on this quick map (drag the marker to move the line north and south, then see where in the world passes through that latitude).

JavaScript: UTM ↔ LatLng

latlng_utm

I’m sure this has been done (more thoroughly) many times before, but I wanted to take a crack at the simplified UTM/LatLng conversion equations (as listed here). You can find my functions, latLngToUTM(lat,lng) and utmToLatLng(easting,northing,zone), here.

Old Prince George Floodplain Map

flood

Just thought I’d share a cool looking old map overlay I found digging through the BC Map Services. I enjoy the very detailed, yet simple look. I’ve also superimposed the City of Prince George Flood Plain 1997 layer, which I think is the digitized version of the scanned BC map. Kinda scary to see how far up Patricia/Winnipeg/17th/Massey it would flood, but I guess the City’s got it figured out.

UrtheCast Satellites

urthecast

I’m working my way through the UrtheCast API documentation, and got side-tracked into making a satellite tracker map. This map shows the ten most recent locations of four satellites (ISS, Deimos-1, Deimos-2, and Lansat-8) and their imagery swaths, I think. The reason I say I think is that the call for the imagery swaths (or the forecast) is set for the future, although the returned timestamps appear to be in the past.

I also think I figured out how to hide my UrtheCast api key and secret from prying eyes through a PHP proxy, but I could also be wrong about that! If you can see them, let me know.:)